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vRSLCM deployment is not available

vRSLCM deployment is not available

During one of the recent VCF 3.9.1 deployments I’ve found interesting challenge while trying to deploy vRealize Suite components.

Initially integrated with MyVMware and downloaded a vRealize Suite Lifecycle Manager version 2.1 (the only one avaialble to download).

Without paying much attention to the Build Number, which was part of the problem. Even though my vRSLCM was downloaded and properly listed in download history in vRealize Suite tab I was still getting an information that my vRSLCM is not available as follows:

First suspicion went to the build inconsistency, but after doublechecking the Repository there was no vRSLCM with BN 14062628 available at all. BN: 16154511 is a newer build then I thought maybe it was overridden and decided to remove the one I have and check whether it will appear.

In order to remove a bundle from existing repo you need to use cleanup_bundle.py script available on SDDC-Manager – procedure will be described later on in this blog post.

However, it didn’t help – still the only bundle available was pointing to BN 16154511. Then accidentally I bumped into a KB: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/76869 which doesn’t seem to be related however it describes the procedure how to application-prod.properties file which contains the expected vRSLCM expected version to another one.

Using the procedure I changed the version to include BN 16154511, restarted LCM service and apparently it fixed the problem!

Hope it’s going to help not only me 🙂

VMware Auto Deploy Configuration in vSphere 6.5

VMware Auto Deploy Configuration in vSphere 6.5

 

 

 

The architecture of auto deploy has changed in vSphere 6.5, one of the main difference is the ImageBuilder build in vCenter and the fact that you can create image profiles through the GUI instead of PowerCLI. That is really good news for those how is not keen on PowerCLI. But let’s go throgh the new configuration process of Auto Deploy. Below I gathered all the necessary steps to configure Auto Deploy in your environment.

  1. Enable Auto Deploy services on vCenter Server. Move to Administration -> System Configuration -> Related Objects, look for and start fallowing services:
  • Auto Deploy
  • ImageBuilder Service

You can change the startup type to start them with the vCenter server automatically as well.

Caution! In case you do not see any services like on the screan below, probably vmonapi and vmware-sca services are stopped.ad1

To start them, log in to vCenter Server through SSH and use fallowing commands:

#service-control  – -status         // to verify the status of these services

#service-control  – -start vmonapi vmware-sca       //to start services

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Next, go back to Web Client and refresh the page.

 

  1. Prepare the DHCP server and configure DHCP scope including default gateway. A Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) scope is the consecutive range of possible IP addresses that the DHCP server can lease to clients on a subnet. Scopes typically define a single physical subnet on your network to which DHCP services are offered. Scopes are the primary way for the DHCP server to manage distribution and assignment of IP addresses and any related configuration parameters to DHCP clients on the network.

When basic DHCP scope settings are ready, you need to configure additional options:

  • Option 066 – with the Boot Server Host Name
  • Option 067 – with the Bootfile Name (it is a file name observed at Auto Deploy Configuration tab on vCenter Server – kpxe.vmw-hardwired)

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  1. Configure TFTP server. For lab purposes I nearly always using the SolarWinds TFTP server, it is very easy to manage. You need to copy the TFTP Boot Zip files available at Auto Deploy Configuration page observed in step 2 to TFTP server file folder and start the TFTP service.

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At this stage when you are try to boot you fresh server should get the IP Address and connect to TFTP server. In the  Discovered Hosts tab of Auto Deploy Configuration you will be able to see these host which received IP addresses and some information from TFTP server, but no Deploy Rule has been assigned to them.

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  1. Create an Image Profile.

Go to Auto Deploy Configuration page -> Software Depots tab  and Import Software Depot

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Click on Image Profiles so see the Image Profiles that are defined in this Software Depot.

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The ESXi software depot contains the image profiles and software packages (VIBs) that are used to run ESXi. An image profile is a list of VIBs.

 

Image profiles define the set of VIBs to boot ESXi hosts with. VMware and VMware partners make image profiles and VIBs available in public depots. Use the Image Builder PowerCLI to  examine the depot and the Auto Deploy rule engine to specify which image profile to assign to which host. VMware customers can create a custom image profile based on the public image profiles and VIBs in the depot and apply that image profile to the host.

 

  1. Add Software Depot.

Click on Add Software Depot icon and add custom depot.

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Next point in the newly created custom software depot select Image Profiles and click  New Image Profile.

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I selected the minimum required VIBs to boot ESXi host which are:

  • esx-base 6.5.0-0.0.4073352 VMware ESXi is a thin hypervisor integrated into server hardware.
  • misc-drivers 6.5.0-0.0.4073352 This package contains miscellaneous vmklinux drivers
  • net-vmxnet3 1.1.3.0-3vmw.650.0.0.4073352 VMware vmxnet3
  • scsi-mptspi 4.23.01.00-10vmw.650.0.0.4073352 LSI Logic Fusion MPT SPI driver
  • shim-vmklinux-9-2-2-0 6.5.0-0.0.4073352 Package for driver vmklinux_9_2_2_0
  • shim-vmklinux-9-2-3-0 6.5.0-0.0.4073352 Package for driver vmklinux_9_2_3_0
  • vmkplexer-vmkplexer 6.5.0-0.0.4073352 Package for driver vmkplexer
  • vsan 6.5.0-0.0.4073352 VSAN for ESXi.
  • vsanhealth 6.5.0-0.0.4073352 VSAN Health for ESXi.
  • ehci-ehci-hcd 1.0-3vmw.650.0.0.4073352 USB 2.0 ehci host driver
  • xhci-xhci 1.0-3vmw.650.0.0.4073352 USB 3.0 xhci host driver
  • usbcore-usb 1.0-3vmw.650.0.0.4073352 USB core driver
  • vmkusb 0.1-1vmw.650.0.0.4073352 USB Native Driver for VMware

But the list could be different for you.

 

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  1. Create a Deploy Rule.

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  1. Activate Deploy Rule

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  1. That’s it, now you can restart you host, it should boot and install according to your configuration now.
VMware Auto Deploy considerations

VMware Auto Deploy considerations

According to VMware definitione vSphere Auto Deploy can provision hundreds of physical hosts with ESXi software. You can specify the image to deploy and the hosts to provision with the image. Optionally, you can specify host profiles to apply to the hosts, a vCenter Server location (datacenter, folder or cluster), and assign a script bundle for each host. In short that is the tool to automate your ESXi deployment or upgrade.

As far as I know in particular on the Polish market it is not a widely used tool. However, it can be helpful for Integrator’s Companies to improve and make far more faster deployment of new environments. Furthermore, VMware claims the scripted or automated deployments should be used for every deployment with 5 or more hosts. Nonetheless, even if you are woring as a System Engineer or  at other implementation position I believe you are not installing new deployments every week..If that is every month – lucky you.

Well, is it really worth to prepare the AutoDeploy environment to deploy for instance 8 new hosts? – It depends.

IMHO, for such small deployments if you are really keen on making it a little bit fater the better way is to use kickstarts scripts. It can be much faster, expecially in case you are using them at least from time to time and you have prepared a good template (According the vSphere 6.5 I’m changing my mind a little bit due to changes which make AutoDpeloy preparation far more quicker)

However, Auto Deploy that’s not only deployment. It can be a kind of environment and change management. That can only be a specific kind of infrastructure where you use AutoDeploy to boot ESXi hosts instead of booting from local hard drives/SD cards.

Nevertheless, in Polands it is easier to meet classic PXE deployment booting from SAN than AutoDeploy. Is it the same trend seen around the world?

I am looking forward to hearing from you about yours experience with Auto Deploy.

VCSA deployment and migration options

VCSA deployment and migration options

The vCenter Server Appliance deployment experience has been enhanced in the vSphere 6.5 release. Installation workflow is now performed in 2 stages. The first stage deploys an appliance with the basic configuration parameters: IP, hostname, and sizing information including storage, memory, and CPU resources.
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Stage 2 then completes the configuration by setting up SSO and role-specific settings. Once Stage 1 is complete we can now snapshot the VM and rollback if any mistakes are made in Stage 2. This prevents from having to start completely over if anything were to go wrong during the deployment process.

NOTE!!! There are versions of the deployment application available for Windows, Linux, and macOS.

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 A new feature in vSphere 6.5 is the ability to migrate a Windows vCenter Server 5.5 or 6.0 to a vCenter Server Appliance 6.5. The migration process starts by running the Migration Assistant, which serves two purposes. The first, pre-checks of the source Windows vCenter Server 5.5 or 6.0 to determine if it meets the criteria to be migrated. Second, it is the data transport mechanism that migrates data from the source Windows vCenter Server 5.5 or 6.0 to the target vCenter Server Appliance 6.5.

The Migration tool will automatically deploy a new vCenter Server Appliance 6.5 and migrate configuration, inventory, and alarm data by default from a Windows vCenter Server 5.5 or 6.0. If you want to keep your historical and performance data (stats, events, tasks) along with configuration, inventory, and alarm data there is the option to also migrate that information. The vSphere 6.5 release of the Migration Tool provides granularity for historical and performance data selection.

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Both embedded and external topologies are supported, the Migration Tool will not allow changing your topology during the migration process. Changing of topologies will need to be done before the migration process if consolidation of your vSphere SSO domain is required.

SUMMARY:

  • 5 support for Windows vCenter 5.5 or 6.0 à 6.5
  • Migrations for both embedded and external topologies
  • VUM included
  • Embedded and external Database support: MSSQL, MSSQL Express, Oracle
  • Option to select historical and performance data