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VSAN real capacity utilization

VSAN real capacity utilization

There are a few caveats that make the calculation and planning of VSAN capacity tough and gets even harder when you try to map it with real consumption on the VSAN datastore level.

  1. VSAN disks objects are thin provisioned by default.
  2. Configuring full reservation of storage space through Object Space Reservation rule in Storage Policy, does not mean

disk object block will be inflated on a datastore. This only means the space will be reserved and showed as used in VSAN Datastore Capacity pane.

Which makes it even harder to figure out why size of “files” on this datastore is not compliant with other information related to capacity.

  1. In order to plan capacity you need to include overhead of Storage Policies. Policies – as I haven’t met an environment which would use only one for all kinds of workloads. This means that planning should start with dividing workloads for different groups which might require different levels of protections.
  1. Apart from disks objects there are different objects especially SWAP which are not displayed in GUI and can be easily forgotten. However, based on the size of environment they might consume considerable amount of storage space.
  1. VM SWAP object does not adhere to Storage Policy assigned to VM. What does it mean? Even if you configure your VM’s disks with PFTT=0

SWAP will always utilize PFTT=1. Unless you configure advanced option (SwapThickProfivisionedDisabled) to disable it.

I have made a test to check how much space will consume my empty VM. (Empty means here without operating system even)

In order to see that a VM called Prod-01 has been created with 1 GB of memory and 2 GB of Hard disk and default storage policy assigned (PFTT=1)

Based on the Edit Setting window the VM disk size on datastore is 4 GB (Maximum sized based on disk size and policy). However, used storage space is 8 MB which means there will be 2 replicas 4 MB each, which is fine as there is no OS installed at all.

VMka wyłączona

However, when you open datastore files you will see this list with Virtual Disk object you will notice that the size is 36 864 KB which gives us 36 MB. So it’s neither 4 GB nor 8 MB as displayed by edit setting consumption..vsan pliki

Meanwhile datastore provisioned space is listed as 5,07 GB.

vmka dysk 2GB default policy i 1GB RAM - wyłączona

 

So let’s power on that VM.

Now the disks size remain intact, but other files appear as for instance SWAP has been created as well as log and other temporary files.

VSAN VMKa wlaczona

 

Looking at datastore provisioned space now it shows 5,9 GB. Which again is confisung even if we forgot about previous findings powering on VM triggers SWAP creation which according to the theory should be protected with PFTT=1 and be thick provisioned. But if that’s the case then the provisioned storage consumption should be increased by 2 GB not 0,83 (where some space is consumed for logs and other small files included in Home namespace object)

 

vmka dysk 2GB default policy i 1GB RAM - włączona

Moreover during those observations I noticed that during the VM booting process the provisioned space is peaking up to 7,11 GB for a very short period of time

And this value after a few seconds decreases to 5.07 GB. Even after a few reboots those values stays consistent.

vmka dysk 2GB default policy i 1GB RAM - podczas bootowania

The question is why those information are not consistent and what heppens during booting of the VM that is the reason for peak of provisioned space?

That’s the quest for not to figure it out 🙂

 

 

Virtual SAN Storage performance tests in action

Virtual SAN Storage performance tests in action

Virtual SAN provides the Storage Performance Proactive Tests which lets you to check parameters of your environment in an easy way. You just need few clicks to run a test.

Well, we can see a lot of tests from nested labs in the Internet, however there are not so many real examples.

I decided to share some results of such a real environment which consists 5 ESXi hosts. Each is equipped with 1x SSD Disk 1,92 TB and 5x HDD 4 TB.

It’s almost 10% of space reserved for cache on SSD. VMware claims that the minimum is 10% so it shouldn’t be so bad.

Since Virtual SAN 6.2 released with vSphere 6.0 Update 2, VMware makes the testing of performance much more easy. That’s possible thanks to Storage Performance Proactive Tests which lets you to check parameters of your environment in an easy way. They are available from Web Client, you just need few clicks to run a test. Perhaps those aren’t the most sophisticated whilst they are really easy to use.

To start some tests, simply move to Monitor>Virtual SAN>Proactive Tests tab on VSAN cluster level and click at run test button (green triangle).

As you quickly realise there are few kind of tests:

  • Stress Test
  • Low Stress test
  • Basic Sainity Test, focus on Flash cache layer
  • Performance characterization – 100% Read, optimal RC usage
  • Performance characterization – 100% Write, optimal WB usage
  • Performance characterization – 100% Read, optimal RC usage after warm-up
  • Performance characterization – 70/30 read/write mix, realistic, optimal flash cache usage
  • Performance characterization – 70/30 read/write mix, realistic, High I/O Size, optimal flash cache usage
  • Performance characterization – 100% read, Low RC hit rate / All-Flash Demo
  • Performance characterization – 100% streaming reads
  • Performance characterization – 100% streaming writes

 

Let’s start from a multicast performance test of our network. In case the received bandwidth is below 75 MB/s the rest would fail.

multicast-performance-test

Caution!!! VMware doesn’t recommend using this tests  on production environments especially during business hours.

Test number 1 – Low stress test, the duration set to 5 minutes.

low-stress

As we can see the IOPS counts around 40K for my cluster of five hosts. The average throughput around 30 MB/s, gives ca. 155 MB/s total.

Test number 2 – Stress test, duration set to 5 minutes.

stress-test

Here we can see that my VSAN reached about 37K of IOPS and almost 260 MB /s of throughput.

Test number 3 – Basic Sanity test, focus on Flash cache layer, duration set to 5 minutes

basic-sanity-test-focus-on-flash-cache-layer

Test number 4 – 100% read, optimal RC usage, duration set to 5 minutes.

100-percent-read-optimal-rc-usage

Here we can see how does the SSD performs while most of the reads

Test number 5 –  100% read, optimal RC usage after warm-up

100-percent-read-optimal-rc-usage-after-warmup

Test number 6 – 100 % write, optimal WB usage

100-percent-write-optimal-wb-usage

 

 

If you have any other real results of your VSAN I’d be glad to see it and compare different configurations.