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VCSA Tools – Part 1 – journalctl. Better way for vCSA log revision.

VCSA Tools – Part 1 – journalctl. Better way for vCSA log revision.

There’s a plenty of great CLI tools in VCSA that modern vSphere administrator should know, so I decided to share my knowledge and describe them in the series of articles.

The first one is journalctl. A tool that simplifies and quickens the VCSA troubleshooting process.

Below I’m presenting how I’m using it, to filter the logs records.

Log in to VCSA shell and run the commands below, regarding to the result you want to achive.

The logs from the current boot:

journalctl -b


The boots that journald is aware of:

journalctl --list-boots

It will show this kind of results representing each known boot:

-3 26c7f0e356eb4d0bbd8d9fad1b457808 Wed 2019-01-09 15:18:12 UTC—Wed 2019-01-09 16:58:18 UTC
-2 124d73cf46d441908db7609813e0c49a Wed 2019-01-09 17:01:08 UTC—Fri 2019-01-11 10:22:39 UTC
-1 ebf1ba1936404fb086727b61ac825d47 Fri 2019-01-11 11:22:59 UTC—Fri 2019-01-11 15:48:37 UTC
 0 bd70a6d99a7245dc9b7859c5f2a7ef6f Mon 2019-01-14 10:19:47 UTC—Tue 2019-01-15 12:38:16 UTC

Now you can use it, to display the results of the chosen boot:

journalctl -b -1


To limit the results to the given timeframe, use dates or keywords:

journalctl --since "2019-01-10" --until "2019-01-14 03:00"

or:

journalctl --since yesterday

or:

journalctl --since 09:00 --until "2 hour ago"


Limiting the logs by service name:

Get the service names first:

systemctl list-unit-files | grep -i vmware

To show only records for vpxd service in current boot:

journalctl -b -u vmware-vpxd.service


Filtering by Id (Process, User or Group):

Get the user Id, e.g.:

cat /etc/passwd | grep -i updatemgr

then:

journalctl _UID=1017 --since today


Filtering by the binary path:

journalctl -b --since "20 minute ago" /usr/sbin/vpxd


Displaying kernel messages:

journalctl -k


Limiting messages by their priorities:

journalctl -p err -b

where the priority codes are:

0: emerg
1: alert
2: crit
3: err
4: warning
5: notice
6: info
7: debug

Of course those examples don’t exhaust all the possibilities this tool has, but consider them as a usage starting point. Feel free to add new, useful examples in comments below.

That’s all for today!